In an Economy of Grace…

In an economy of grace, there is enough to go around.  The Father’s love and generosity are not scarce,  His table is brimming with luxurious fare.  That is why we invite those who cannot repay us.  After all, it is not our table, but his.  It is Christ who speaks to us today in the words of the prophet (Isaiah 55:1-2)

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 197

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The Church Lives in an Economy of Gratitude…

As a recipient of this covenantal exchange between the Father and the incarnate Son, the church lives in an economy of gratitude rather than either sacrifice or as an extension of Christ’s atoning work.  We are passive receivers of the gift of salvation, but we are thereby rendered active worshipers in a life of thanksgiving that is exhibited chiefly in loving service to our neighbors.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 195

What Do We Do With Our Guilt Over Our Sin?

Yet the good news is that God provides the sacrifice for guilt.  After the fall in Genesis 3, God clothed Adam and Eve with sacrificial skins, pointing to the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.  God wasn’t bound in any way to do this.  It’s a sheer act of free mercy on his part.  The whole sacrificial system of the Old Testament pointed forward to the moment when God the Son, in our flesh, would bear the curse for our sin and bring an end to all sacrifices.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 195

Do We Enjoy Our Neighbor?

Do we enjoy our neighbor?  It’s a lot easier to serve a neighbor than to enjoy him or her.  It’s a lot easier to see me and my service as a gift to someone less fortunate, without seeing a “needy” person as a gift to me.  In addition, it’s a lot easier to enjoy the “neighbor” I’ll serve in the soup line – whom I’ll probably not see again, at least for more than five or ten minutes at a time – than one who actually lives next door and wakes me up after midnight with wild parties.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 194

Stop Looking for Extraordinary Callings

We need to stop looking for extraordinary callings to give meaning to our lives, which often encourage us to think of others as tools in our self-crafting.  It’s not “the needy” who need us, but particular people – many of whom we come across each day.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 190-191