Do We Enjoy Our Neighbor?

Do we enjoy our neighbor?  It’s a lot easier to serve a neighbor than to enjoy him or her.  It’s a lot easier to see me and my service as a gift to someone less fortunate, without seeing a “needy” person as a gift to me.  In addition, it’s a lot easier to enjoy the “neighbor” I’ll serve in the soup line – whom I’ll probably not see again, at least for more than five or ten minutes at a time – than one who actually lives next door and wakes me up after midnight with wild parties.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 194

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Even With the Best of Intentions, We err

Even with the best motives and intentions, we can become so busy seeking to bring praise to God through what we do for him that we don’t delight in him for who he is and for what he has given us.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 194

Stop Looking for Extraordinary Callings

We need to stop looking for extraordinary callings to give meaning to our lives, which often encourage us to think of others as tools in our self-crafting.  It’s not “the needy” who need us, but particular people – many of whom we come across each day.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 190-191

The Means of Grace Often Becomes Yesterday’s News

Chasing the latest fad for spiritual growth, church growth and cultural impact, we eventually forget both how to reach the lost and how to keep the reached.  The ordinary means of grace becomes yesterday’s news.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 178

We Need to Reduce…

We need to reduce the distractions and voracious consumption.  Many things we do as “something more” aren’t bad in themselves.  Yet collectively they contribute to a whirling buzz of confusion that keeps us from fixing our eyes on Christ and his kingdom and his ordinary means of grace.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 177

The Lord’s Day is not A Prison But a Palace

The Lord’s Day is not a prison but a palace.  It is a wonderful gift to turn off the devices that interrupt our daily schedules and to push our roots down into the fertile soil that produces trees in God’s garden.  It is a delight to set aside our normal associations with friends and co-workers – even non-Christian family members – in order to commiserate with fellow heirs of the kingdom concerning the news we’ve heard about the age to come.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 176-177