We Earn Nothing. We Boast in Nothing. We Don’t Save Ourselves!

But the truth is that the salvation by grace seems  simple, it’s actually hard because it requires that we humbly come empty handed to God. We earn nothing. Jesus earns it all. We boast  in nothing. Jesus gets all of our boasting. We don’t save ourselves. Jesus alone saves us.

– Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 74

Old Nature vs. New Nature

In Ephesians 2:1-10, Paul contrasts our old nature with our new nature in this way:

Old Nature

New Nature

Separated from Christ United to Christ
Disobedient Obedient
Ruled by spiritual evil Sharing Jesus’s rule over spiritual evil
Objects of God’s wrath Objects of God’s affection
Brings vague uncertainty about sin Brings specific awareness of sin
Walking in sin Walking in good works
Destined for hell Seated with Christ in heaven

– Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 73

We Get Into Trouble When We Forget this Fact

Thankfully, Jesus rules above Satan and demons, and has defeated their hold on us through his sinless life, substitutionary death, bodily resurrection, and exultation to the throne.  He sits in heaven today, where he rules over everyone and everything including Satan and demons. While Satan is ultimately defeated, he is still trying to war against us and against God, much like a foreign king who has lost the war but has yet to surrender.  Skirmishes continue as enemy soldiers and snipers continue their assault, but in Christ, we do not have to be defeated, this is victory and authority or power victory and authority. We get into trouble when we forget this fact and instead give Satan a foothold, inviting him to have authority in our lives.

– Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 72

Who Is a Christian?

A Christian is one who repents, which literally means turning his back to sin and his face toward God, and walks with Jesus as his new identity. In Christ, we’re saved from a worldly way of living and transformed to a holy way of living. In God’s grace, this can establish a new pattern for generations to come as our children and grandchildren are encouraged to follow in our proverbial footsteps with Jesus.

– Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 71

In Christ, We Are Free From the Power and Penalty of Sin

Thankfully, in Christ, we are safe from our sins and the consequence of death. Because Jesus died, each of us come with a new life as a new person with new desires for the things of God, free from the penalty and power of sin. Because Jesus rose, we live spiritually alive and will one day rise physically from death, like Jesus to be with him and like him for ever.

– Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 70

We Need To Accept Our Identity Apart From Christ First

Before we can understand and embrace our identity in Christ, we must first accept our identity apart from Christ. Becoming a Christian is not merely accepting the truth about Jesus as our savior. It’s also accepting the truth about ourselves as needy sinners.

– Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 70

Then Shall Be Complete Emancipation From Sin and Its Effects and Affects

In the New Testament “salvation” is threefold its scope past, present, and future; and it is threefold and his character from the penalty of sin, from the power of sin, and from the presence of sin. Every believer has been saved for the penalty of sin… But we shall yet be saved from the very presence of sin… At our Lord’s return we shall be completely emancipated from the dominion and pollution of sin.

– A.W.Pink

as quoted by Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 68

The Curious Comparison of the First and Second Adam

In the Bible, Paul called Jesus the quote last Adam” because he is the remedy for idolatry and the redeemer of humanity, whereas the first Adam was the source of idolatry and the downfall of humanity. The first Adam turned from the Father in the garden; the last Adam turned to the Father in a garden. The first Adam was naked and ashamed; last that was naked and bore our shame. The first Adam’s sin brought us thorns; the last Adam wore a crown of thorns. The first Adam substituted himself for God; the last Adam was God substituting himself for sinners. The first Adam sinned on a tree; the last Adam bore our sin at a tree. The first Adam died as a sinner; the last Adam died for sinners.

– Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 15

Understanding This is the Key to Your Transformation

But God knows what you do flows from who you are. As Christians, we live from our identity, not for our identity. We are defined by who we are in Christ, not what we do or fail to do for Christ. Christ defines who we are by who he is and what he’s done for us, in us, and through us. Understanding this information is the key to your transformation.

– Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 18