The Hope Found in One Example

In considering what it means for us to put on the mind of Christ, we can easily distance ourselves from Jesus’s preoccupation with his mission – he was, after all, the Messiah, the Sent one.  He was sinless and had none of the distractions of family, work, and modern life to stand in the way of his calling.  But rather than succumb to those distractions, we can find hope by following Christ’s example of single-minded devotion to the things of God.

– Brennan Manning, The Importance of Being Foolish: How to Think Like Jesus, HarperOne, copyright 2005, page 125-126

The Wellspring of Jesus’s Zeal in Ministry

Jesus’s self-awareness and unflagging zeal in his ministry must be seen in direct and unceasing relation to his interior life of growing intimacy with the Father.  We must not loose sight of this logical link: the primacy of mission and his consuming zeal for proclaiming the kingdom of God derive not from theological reflection, the desire to edify others, trendy spirituality, or a lose sense of goodwill toward the world.  Its wellspring is God’s holiness and Jesus’s self-awareness of his relation to God.

– Brennan Manning, The Importance of Being Foolish: How to Think Like Jesus, HarperOne, copyright 2005, page 122-123

An All-Consuming Thirst for the Things of God

The mind of Jesus is focused on the fulfillment of God’s will through the proclamation of the Reign of God.  Jesus’ intimacy with God and awareness of God’s holiness fill him with an all-consuming thirst for the things of God.

– Brennan Manning, The Importance of Being Foolish: How to Think Like Jesus, HarperOne, copyright 2005, page 119

Why Jesus Lives

In the man Jesus there is an utter single-mindedness toward God.  But more than knowledge and heart connection is involved; Jesus lives in order to shed light on the reign of God and life in God’s kingdom. (John 4:34; John 14:10; Luke 22:42).

– Brennan Manning, The Importance of Being Foolish: How to Think Like Jesus, HarperOne, copyright 2005, page 118

The Axis of the Christian Moral Revolution is Love

The axis of the Christian moral revolution is love (Jesus called it the sign by which the disciple would be recognized).  The hunger lurks in our subtle attempts to minimize, rationalize, and justify our moderation in this regard.  Turning the other cheek, walking the extra mile, offering no resistance to injury, being reconciled with one another, and forgiving seventy times seven times are not arbitrary whims of the Savior.

– Brennan Manning, The Importance of Being Foolish: How to Think Like Jesus, HarperOne, copyright 2005, page 113-114