Even the Christian Needs God’s Law Applied to Their Life Completely, Consistently and Continually

Q. “Since no one in this life can obey the Ten Commandments perfectly, why does God want them preached so pointedly?”

A.:  First, so that the longer we live the more we may come to know our sinfulness and the more eagerly look to Christ for forgiveness of sins and righteousness.  Second, so that we may never stop striving and never stop praying to God for the grace of the Holy Spirit, to be renewed more and more after God’s image until after this life we reach our goal: perfection.”

– Heidelberg Catechism

Even in the Christian life we need this first use of the law to drive us out of ourselves to cling to our Savior.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 43-44

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Sin is Not Just About Our Thoughts, Actions or Failing to Meet Some Standard

Sin is therefore not just our wicked thoughts and actions that break God’s laws; it is not just failing to meet up to God’s expectations for us; it is a posture and a commitment to turn away from the living God to run after other things and bow in worship to them.  God hates sin and told Adam that the consequences of sin would be death (Genesis 2:17)

Duguid, Barbara; Extravagant Grace: God’s Glory Displayed in our Weakness; P&R Publishing; Philipsburg, NJ; copyright 2013; Page 99

Our View of Grace is Inextricably Linked to Our View of the Law

Only when we understand that God’s Law is absolutely inflexible will we see that God’s grace is absolutely indispensible.  A high view of Law involves the devastating reminder that God’s acceptance of us is ultimately contingent on Christ’s imputation, not our improvement.  Such inscrutable demands push us twoard the infallible deliverance we find in the Gospel.  In other words, a high view of the Law produces a high view of grace.  A low view of the the Law produces a very low view of grace.

– Tchividian, Tullian; One Way Love: Inexhaustible Grace for an Exhausted World; David Cook Publishers; copyright 2013; Kindle Edition; Location 1005

We Hate This More Thank Being Told What to Do…

The law offends us because it tells us what to do – and most of the time, we hate anyone telling us what to do.  But ironically, grace offends us even more, because it tells us that there is nothing we can do, that everything has already been done.  And if there is something we hate more than being told what to do, it’s being told that we can’t do anything, that we can’t earn anything – that we are helpless, weak and needy.

– Tchividian, Tullian; One Way Love: Inexhaustible Grace for an Exhausted World; David Cook Publishers; copyright 2013; Kindle Edition; Location 698

Small “L” Laws

Law with a small “l” refers to an interior principle of demand or ought that seems universal in human nature.  In this sense, law is any voice that makes us feel we must do something or be something in order to merit the approval of another…In daily living, law is an internalized principle of self-accusation.  We might say that the innumerable laws we carry inside us are bastard children of the Law.

– Paul Zahl

as quoted by Tchividian, Tullian; One Way Love: Inexhaustible Grace for an Exhausted World; David Cook Publishers; copyright 2013; Kindle Edition; Location 625

The Divine Ought

One way to think of the Law of God would be as the divine “Ought.”  It goes without saying that the author of the Law is God Himself – not us – and as such, the Law is good and perfect and true.  I’ll say it again: the Law is good!

– Tchividian, Tullian; One Way Love: Inexhaustible Grace for an Exhausted World; David Cook Publishers; copyright 2013; Kindle Edition; Location 567