Are We to Pretend We Are Happy and Fake Joy?

When we feel neglected, taken advantage of, and taken for granted, we can fall prey to grumbling. The Bible is clear that grumbling is a sin, but how do we stop grumbling? Do we just stuff our frustration, pretend we are happy, and fake joy? No. Instead, we must stop looking to people for appreciation and start looking to Jesus.

– Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 57

Exchange Grumbling for Prayer

What if you’d exchanged grumbling for praying? By praying, we talk to God rather than gossip to others, we invite God help us, to protect our hearts from bitterness and anger, and to change not only our circumstances externally but also our hearts internally. If you’re not already, start praying for others today.

– Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 59

Knowing God appreciates us allows us to exchange our performance for service. Performance is done for the site and approval of others. Service is done knowing that God is watching and approving whether or not anyone else is. Performance causes us to be enslaved to others’ opinions, unable to say no, and prone to being overworked. Service frees us to do what God wants, thereby saying no as needed.

– Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 61

Why Some Pray Differently and Frequently

Those who know that God appreciates them, pray frequently and differently. They pray frequently because they are aware of God’s work in the lives of others, giving them more to pray about. And they pray differently because they are focused on others and their needs, giving thanks for the work of God’s people instead of focusing on themselves. This explains why roughly half of Ephesians is composed of prayer

– Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 62

What Christians Are to Do…

Imagining God involves thinking with our heads, feeling with our hearts, and doing with our hands. We’re to think God’s thoughts and agree with his truth is revealed in Scripture. We’re to feel God’s feelings, such as hating injustice and oppression, loving people, greeting sends devastating effects, and rejoicing in redemption. We’re to join God’s work using our hands to serve others, Christian and non-, with acts of compassion and generosity. When reflects something of gods with our heads hearts and hands out of love from him and others, we do what we are created for this is joyful for us, helpful for others, and worshipful towards God.

– Driscoll, Mark; Who Do You Think You Are? Finding Your True Identity in ChristThomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, copyright 2013; Page 3

We Are to be a Light Set Upon a Hill

Because Christ is Lord, there is a church in exile, receiving everything from heaven, and on earth witnessing to, loving and serving their neighbors.  For a new reformation in the church and renewed witness in the world, we need not only to re-arm ourselves with drama and the doctrine, but  allow the greatest story ever told to shape us into a cross-cultural community – a light set upon a hill.

Horton, Michael; The Gospel Driven Life: Being Good News People in a Bad News World; Baker Books; Grand Rapids, MI; Copyright 2009; page 264

To What, In Heaven’s Name is Christian Dogma Relevant?

But if Christian dogma is irrelevant to life, to what, in Heaven’s name, is it relevant? – since religious dogma is in fact nothing but a statement of doctrines concerning the nature of life and the universe.  If Christian ministers really believe it is only an intellectual game for theologians and has no bearing on human life, it is no wonder that their congregations are ignorant, bored and bewildered.

Dorothy Sayers

as quoted by Horton, Michael; The Gospel Driven Life: Being Good News People in a Bad News World; Baker Books; Grand Rapids, MI; Copyright 2009; page 263