We Do Not Need More

In church today, we do not need more conferences, more programs, and more celebrities.  We need more churches where the Spirit is immersing sinners into Christ day by day, a living communion of the saints where we cannot simply jump to our favorite chapter or Google our momentary interest.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 34

These Qualities are Cultivated the Fertile Soil of the Gospel

My point is that these qualities – the “fruit of the Spirit” – are cultivated in the fertile soil of the gospel; they wither in the toxic atmosphere of restless innovation as well as sleepy traditionalism.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 30

Patience is Precisely What Excellence Requires…

Patience is precisely what excellence requires, but it’s a difficult commodity wherever the cult of immediate results dominates.  Faithfulness over the long haul is undermined by perpetual innovation.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 30

Excellence is not the Problem

Obviously, excellence is not the problem; we mean quality or quantity, hype or substance, perpetual novelty or maturity.  If we were to measure excellence by God’s standards, the list might seem a little strange: “love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control” (Galatians 5:22).

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 29

Biblically Defined, True Excellence

Excellence requires caring about someone or something enough to invest time, effort and skill into it, with God’s glory and our neighbor’s good as the goal.  Biblically defined, true excellence has others in mind – first God and then our neighbor (I Corinthians 10:31).

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 28-29

“In the Garden” is Bad Theology

Despite the touching sentimentality of my grandmother’s favorite hymn, “In the Garden,” it is simply not true that you come to the garden alone with Jesus and “the joy we share as we tarry there none other has ever known.”  If you personal relationship with Jesus is utterly unique, then it is not properly Christian.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 27