Is the Call to Radical Transformation of Society Right?

The call to radical transformation of society can easily distract faith’s gaze from Christ and focus it on ourselves.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 155

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So What Does It Mean to be Content with God’s Provision?

So what does it mean to be content with God’s provision?  It means that when you and I are safely hidden with Christ in God through faith in his gospel, we are opened up to the others around us – first fellow saints, and then our other neighbors.  Instead of being threats, they are fellow guests of God at his table.  No longer competitors for commodities in a world of scare resources, they are cosharers with us in the circulation of gifts that flows outward from its source without running out.  After all, that source is the triune God: from the father, in the Son, by the Spirit.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page135

Saving Faith is not the Enemy of Good Works

The Spirit creates faith through the gospel and saving faith bears the fruit of love and good works.  We are united to Christ for justification and renewal.  There must be distinguished, but never separated.  Saving faith is not the enemy of good works, but their only possible source.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 40

Frenetic Activism vs. Faithful Activity

The call to action, to have an active faith, is well-supported in Scripture.  “Ordinary” does not mean passive.  All believers should live out what they believe, should practice what they preach.  But misguided or chaotic activism makes us sloppy.  The real question is: What kind of action?  Why – and to what end?  There is a difference between frenetic activism and faithful activity in the daily struggles and joys of life.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 38

Fan or Follower?

Fans often confuse admiration for devotion.  They mistake their knowledge of Jesus for intimacy with Jesus.  Fans assume their good intentions make up for their apathetic faith.  Maybe you’ve already decided you’re a follow and not a Fan; well, I hope you keep reading, because, one of the core symptoms of “fandom” is that fans almost always consider themselves to be followers.

– Idleman, Kyle; Not a Fan: Becoming a Completely Committed Follower of Jesus; Zondervan; copyright 2011; Grand Rapids, MI; Kindle Edition; page 28