Our User-Friendly God…

We often think we have done God a favor by down-playing the whole idea of His judgment.  Our user-friendly God does not punish sin.  He certainly doesn’t send people to hell.  But hell gives us a picture of the absolute perfection and beauty of GOd.  Hell is what hell is because that’s what sin against an infinitely beautiful and glorious God deserves.  Hell is not one degree hotter than our sin demands it to be.  Hell should make our mouths stand agape at the righteous, just holiness of God.

– Greear, J.D.; Gospel: Recovering the Power that Made Christianity Revolutionary; B&H Publishing Group; Nashville, TN; Copyright 2011; Kindle Edition; page 93

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In This, We Must Practice Great Caution

We can’t help but compare ourselves to others, and other to one another.  Unfortunately, we frequently use these observations to feel superior or inferior to people around us.  We should therefore practice great caution in evaluating the spiritual maturity of people around us.  We can, and at times do, use this information to judge and demean other, or we can use it to love and encourage.

–  Duguid, Barbara; Extravagant Grace: God’s Glory Displayed in our Weakness; P&R Publishing; Philippsburg, NJ; copyright 2013; Page 43

The Gift of Self-Forgetfulness

Those who are born anew are no longer entangled with themselves.  They are solidly free from this entanglement, from self-reflection that always seeks what belongs to itself.  This is not a deadening of self.  No, it is the gift of self-forgetfulness.  The passive righteousness of faith tells us: You do not concern yourself at all!  In that God does what is decisive in us, we may live outside ourselves and solely in him.  Thus, we are hidden from our selves, and removed from the judgment of others or the judgment of ourselves as a final judgment.  “Who am I?”  Such self-reflection never finds peace in itself.

– Oswald Bayer

as quoted by Tchividian, Tullian; One Way Love: Inexhaustible Grace for an Exhausted World; David Cook Publishers; copyright 2013; Kindle Edition; Location 1628

Jesus Came to Unburden Us of Our Efforts at Dealing with Our Imprisonment

The Gospel announces that Jesus came to acquit the guilty.  He came to judge and be judged in our place.  Christ came to satisfy the deep judgment against us once and for all so we could be free from the judgment of God, others and ourselves.  Jesus came to unburden us of our efforts at trying to deal with judgment of our own.

– Tchividian, Tullian; One Way Love: Inexhaustible Grace for an Exhausted World; David Cook Publishers; copyright 2013; Kindle Edition; Location 1265

Judgment Steamrolls Over Us Most of the Time

I wonder if any of us strong enough to withstand the perceived judgments upon our lives, which touch the fears within.  Have you ever tried to win the favor of a person who actively dislikes you?  To get him to like you, you may have changed your style of dress.  You may have altered your schedule.  You may have stopped something you’ve been doing or started something new.  You may have carried out their wishes to the last detail.  You may have tried once, then again, then a thousand times.  But you have not won from this person the affirmation you so deeply desire.  Judgment steamrolls over us most of the time.

– Tchividian, Tullian; One Way Love: Inexhaustible Grace for an Exhausted World; David Cook Publishers; copyright 2013; Kindle Edition; Location 834

The Announcement Made by the Gospel of Grace

The gospel of grace announces that Jesus came to acquit the guilty – He came to judge and be judged in our place.  Christ came to satisfy the deep judgment against us once and for all so that we could be free from the judgment of God, others, and ourselves.  He came to give rest to our efforts at trying to deal with judgment on our own.  The gospel declares that Jesus atoned for our guilt and that the Law has been fulfilled.

– Tchividjian, Tullian; Glorious Ruin: How Suffering Sets You Free; David C Cook Publishers, Copyright 2013, Kindle Edition, page 51-52

Protestant Liberalism’s Gospel

In the 1950’s, Yale’s H. Richard Niebuhr described the so-called “gospel” of Protestant liberalism poignantly  “A God without wrath brought men without sin into a kingdom without judgment through the ministrations of a Christ without a cross.”

– Horton, Michael; The Gospel Driven Life: Being Good News People in a Bad News World; Baker Books; Grand Rapids, MI; Copyright 2009; page