Stop Adding to the Gospel and Become Content

My thesis in this book is that we must turn from the frantic search for “something more” to “something more sustainable.”  We need to stop adding something more of ourselves to the gospel.  We need to be content with the gospel as God’s power for salvation.  We also need to be content with his ordinary means of grace that, over time, yield a harvest of plenty for everyone to enjoy.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page125

Our Problem is a Basic Discontent with the Word of God

The gospel keeps our eyes fixed on Christ, while the law tells us how to run the race.  But our tendency is always to add our own doctrines to the gospel and our own commands and expectations to God’s revealed Word.  No longer content with the gospel and the commands of Scripture, we begin to look for something more.  All the problems that I have described up to this point – and many others besides – result from a basic discontent with God’s Word.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 125

Saving Faith is not the Enemy of Good Works

The Spirit creates faith through the gospel and saving faith bears the fruit of love and good works.  We are united to Christ for justification and renewal.  There must be distinguished, but never separated.  Saving faith is not the enemy of good works, but their only possible source.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 40

What the Gospel is Not

The power of our activism, campaigns, movements and strategies cannot forgive sins or raise the dead.  “The gospel…is the power of God for salvation,” and, with Paul we have no reason to be ashamed of it (Romans 1:16).  That is why phrases like “living the gospel,” “being the gospel,” and “being partners with Jesus in his redemption of the world” are dangerous distortions of the biblical message of good news.  The gospel is not about what we have done or are called to do, but the announcement of G0d’s saving work in Christ Jesus (II Corinthians 4:5).

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 39

These Qualities are Cultivated the Fertile Soil of the Gospel

My point is that these qualities – the “fruit of the Spirit” – are cultivated in the fertile soil of the gospel; they wither in the toxic atmosphere of restless innovation as well as sleepy traditionalism.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 30

Jesus Didn’t Come to this Earth to Change You

Jesus didn’t come to this earth so that you would be better behaved or to tweak your personality or to fine-tune your manners or smooth out your rough spots.  Jesus didn’t even come to this earth to change you.  The truth of the gospel is that Jesus came so that you could die.

– Idleman, Kyle; Not a Fan: Becoming a Completely Committed Follower of Jesus; Zondervan; copyright 2011; Grand Rapids, MI; Kindle Edition; page 166

Believing and Following are Inseparable in terms of Our Response to the Gospel

But the truth is that John 3:16 and Luke 9:23 have to go to together in order for there to be an accurate understanding of the gospel’s invitation.

John 3:16 emphasizes believing.

Luke 9:23 focuses on following.

Those two thing must necessarily go together.  There is no believing without following.  There is no John 3:16 without Luke 9:23.

– Idleman, Kyle; Not a Fan: Becoming a Completely Committed Follower of Jesus; Zondervan; copyright 2011; Grand Rapids, MI; Kindle Edition; page 116