This is Actually Not Exhausting As it May Seem

Living by the Spirit implies a habitual, continual, and active interaction with the Holy Spirit.  While this sounds exhausting, it really isn’t because all of this living and action is done in the power of the Spirit.  It is not by your own strength.

– Chan, Francis; Forgotten God: Reversing the Tragic Neglect of the Holy Spirit; David C. Cook Publishers; Colorado Springs, CO; copyright 2009; p. 131

You Cannot Live This Way

If you truly believe and have turned from the way you were headed and joined a different Way of living, then you desperately need the Holy Spirit.  You cannot live this Way without the Spirit in you.

– Chan, Francis; Forgotten God: Reversing the Tragic Neglect of the Holy Spirit; David C. Cook Publishers; Colorado Springs, CO; copyright 2009; p. 123

Are You Missing Out?

When people give their lives to God in exchange for a ticket out of hell, there is often no turning or change of direction, which is the definition of repentance.  If all you want is a little Jesus to “spiritualize” your life, a little extra God to keep you out of hell, you are missing out on the fullness of life you were created for.

– Chan, Francis; Forgotten God: Reversing the Tragic Neglect of the Holy Spirit; David C. Cook Publishers; Colorado Springs, CO; copyright 2009; p. 122

This is a Much too Convenient Excuse Used By Many Christians

It is easy to use th phrase “God’s will for my life” as an excuse for inaction or disobedience.  It’s much less demanding to think about God’s will for your future than it is to ask Him what He wants you to do in the next ten minutes.  It’s safer to commit to following Him someday instead of this day.

– Chan, Francis; Forgotten God: Reversing the Tragic Neglect of the Holy Spirit; David C. Cook Publishers; Colorado Springs, CO; copyright 2009; p. 120

Just Forget About What is God’s Will for You Life…

I think a lot of us need to forget about “God’s will for my life.”  God cares more about our response to His Spririt’s leading today, in this moment, than about what we intend to do next year.  In fact, the decisions we make next year will be profoundly affected by the degree to which we submit to the Spirit right now, in today’s decisions.

– Chan, Francis; Forgotten God: Reversing the Tragic Neglect of the Holy Spirit; David C. Cook Publishers; Colorado Springs, CO; copyright 2009; p. 120

Oh ‘Christian,’ In This, Do Not Persist

And to expose our hearts to truth and consistently refuse or neglect to obey the impulses it arouses is to stymie the motions of life within us and, if persisted in, to grieve the Holy Spirit into silence.

– A.W. Tozer

– Chan, Francis; Forgotten God: Reversing the Tragic Neglect of the Holy Spirit; David C. Cook Publishers; Colorado Springs, CO; copyright 2009; p. 119

Do Yourself a Favor…Read This Post in Its Entirety

I can totally relate to the prodigal son after he squandered his wealth (Luke 15: 11-32).  I resonate with the feelings he had when he was eating with the pigs, thinking he could back to the father as a slave.  SOmetimes I waited a few days or even weeks before talking to Him because I wanted to have a period of proving myself.  In doing this, I acted like a slave and obeyed as well as I could.  I figured I could still serve Him even though I felt uncomfortable having a real conversation with Him.

Have you ever felt this way?  Do you ever want to distance yourself from Him because you feel so much same over your sin?

This was a regular pattern for me.  I wanted to prove that I was sorry for what I did by being faithful for a period of time.  I wanted to develop a good track record before pursuing my relationship with Him again.  I wanted God to see that I could be a good servant.  Then I felt good enough to talk to God again.  But God didn’t want a good slave who tried really hard.  He wanted me to see that He was a good Father.  He wants intimacy.

– Chan, Francis; Forgotten God: Reversing the Tragic Neglect of the Holy Spirit; David C. Cook Publishers; Colorado Springs, CO; copyright 2009; p. 113

When We Experience This, We Will Begin to Wonder…

We have been chosen, grafted, adopted into the family of God.  And now that we are a part of the family, the Spirit causes us to call out “Abba! Father!”  Remember that Abba is the most intimate form for referring to a father.  It is like saying “Daddy”; it connotes a deep level of familiarity and intimacy.  As God’s Spirit speaks to our hearts, we can call out to God as our Abba.  We will begin to experience this intimate relationship more deeply than we ever thought possible, so much so that we will begin to wonder, Does everyone feel this loved by God?

– Chan, Francis; Forgotten God: Reversing the Tragic Neglect of the Holy Spirit; David C. Cook Publishers; Colorado Springs, CO; copyright 2009; p. 112

This is How to Experience Intimacy and Relationship

I don’t know exactly what it will look like for you to be still before the Lord.  But I do know that no matter what your personality, it is a spiritual discipline to be still, to listen, and to cut out the distraction and din of our world.  And as we practice this stillness, this waiting, this being, it is then we can experience deep intimacy and relationship with the Holy Spirit.

– Chan, Francis; Forgotten God: Reversing the Tragic Neglect of the Holy Spirit; David C. Cook Publishers; Colorado Springs, CO; copyright 2009; p. 109

Let Me Ask You a Simple Question

Jesus refers to the Holy Spirit as the “Helper” or “Comforter”.  Let me ask you a simple question: Why would we need to experience the Comforter if our lives are already comfortable?  It is those who put their lives at risk and suffer for the gospel (Philippians 1:29) who will most often experience His being [close] (Matthew 28:20).  Though this verse is true for all believers (of course God is always with us), if we are never alone or feeling like we need Him, how much do we care or need to know that God is with us?

– Chan, Francis; Forgotten God: Reversing the Tragic Neglect of the Holy Spirit; David C. Cook Publishers; Colorado Springs, CO; copyright 2009; p. 107