If the Heart be Filled with the Cross of Christ

The cross of Christ be glorified and rejoiced in; this his heart was set upon; and these were the effects of it – it crucified the word unto him, made it a dead and undesireable thing.  The baits and pleasures of sin are taken all of them out of the world…If the heart be filled with the cross of Christ, it casts death and undesireableness upon them all; it leafves no seeming beauty, no appearing pleasure of comeliness, in them.

– John Owen, On Indwelling Sin in Believers

as quoted by Piper, John; When I Don’t Desire God: How to Fight for Joy; Crossway; Wheaton, Ill.; copyright  2004; p. 94

Submitting to God and His Sovereign Right

To submit to the Father of our spirit denotes] an acquiescence in His sovereign right to do what He will with us as His own; a renunciation of self-will; an acknowledgement of His righteousness and wisdom in all His dealings with us; a sense of His care and love, with a due apprehension of the end of His chastisements; a diligent application of ourselves unto His mind and will, or to what He calls us to in an especial manner at that season; a keeping of our souls by persevering faith from weariness and despondency; a full resignation o ourselves to His will, as to the matter, manner, times and continuance of our afflictions.

– John Owen

as quoted by Bridges, Jerry; The Disciplined of Grace:God’s Role and Our Role in the Pursuit of Holiness; NavPress; Colorado Springs; copyright 1994; p.226

What Diligence and Watchfulness We Should Have!

When we realize a constant enemy of the soul abides within us, what diligence and watchfulness we should have!  How woeful is the sloth and negligence then of so many who live blind and asleep to this reality of sin.  There is an exceeding efficacy and power in the indwelling sin of believers, for it constantly inclines itself towards evil.  We need to be awake, then, if our hearts would know the ways of God.  Our enemy is not only upon us, as it was with Samson, but it is also in us.

– John Owen

as quoted by Bridges, Jerry; The Disciplined of Grace:God’s Role and Our Role in the Pursuit of Holiness; NavPress; Colorado Springs; copyright 1994; p. 208

Here Then Is Where the Deceit of Sin Intervenes

Here then is where the deceit of sin intervenes.  It separates the doctrine of grace from its purpose.  It persuades us to dwell upon the notion of grace and diverts our attention from the influence that grace gives to achieve its proper application in holy lives.  From the doctrine of assured pardon of sin, it insinuates a carelessness for sin.. the soul – needing frequently to return to gospel grace because of guilt – allows grace to become commonplace and ordinary.  Having found a good medicine for its wound, it then takes it for granted.

– John Owen

as quoted by Bridges, Jerry; The Disciplined of Grace:God’s Role and Our Role in the Pursuit of Holiness; NavPress; Colorado Springs; copyright 1994; p. 197

It May Have Siezed a Fort From Which to Launch its Assault

Sin also carries on its war by entangling the affections [desires] and drawing them into alliance against the mind [our reason].  Grace may be enthroned in the mind, but if sin controls the affections, it has seized a fort from which it will continually assault the soul.  Hence, as we shall see, mortification is chiefly directed to take place upon the affections.

– John Owen

as quoted by Bridges, Jerry; The Disciplined of Grace:God’s Role and Our Role in the Pursuit of Holiness; NavPress; Colorado Springs; copyright 1994; p.

Without Grace, Nothing Good Can Be Done

Let us consider what regard we ought to have to our own duty and to the grace of God.  Some would separate these things as inconsistent.  If holiness be out duty and God’s grace are nowhere opposed in the matter of sanctification; for the one absolutely supports the other.  We cannot perform our duty without the grace of God; nor does God give grace for any other purpose than that we may perform our duty.

– John Owen

– Bridges, Jerry; The Disciplined of Grace:God’s Role and Our Role in the Pursuit of Holiness; NavPress; Colorado Springs; copyright 1994; p. 133