Grace is Everywhere

Grace is everywhere in the creation account. It’s in the rocks; it’s in the trees; it’s in the sky and under the sea.  Grace is the gift of creation given to humanity.

God gave us creation.  He made a cosmic playground and then told us to play.

– Sprinkle, Preston; Charis: God’s Scandalous Grace for Us; David C. Cook Publishing; Colorado Springs, CO; Kindle version; copyright 2014; page 37

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Genesis 1 and the Transcendence of God

Every word in Genesis 1 magnifies the transendence of God.  The word transcendence means surpassing, beyond comprehension, or to exceed usual limits.  It insists that God is not part of this creation but sovereign over it.  He’s without peer or competitor, and He alone has the right and power to rule over creation as He sees fit.  This is the God revealed in the opening chapter of the Bible.  When He says,”jump,” planets leap into orbit.  They don’task “How high?”

– Sprinkle, Preston; Charis: God’s Scandalous Grace for Us; David C. Cook Publishing; Colorado Springs, CO; Kindle version; copyright 2014; page 35

Even in Our Darkest Moments

God doesn’t merely forgive us or save us.  He actually enjoys us – even in our darkest moments.  He doesn’t enjoy our sin, but He enjoys us as redeemed image bearers.  Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection enable His pleasure to flow freely to unpleasurable people who have faith in Him.

– Sprinkle, Preston; Charis: God’s Scandalous Grace for Us; David C. Cook Publishing; Colorado Springs, CO; Kindle version; copyright 2014; page 31

They Are Chari-less

There are many Christians in the church trying to make God love them.  They spend their lives doing, serving, witnessing, fasting, judging, performing and feeling the unbearable weight of condemnation when they fail at these things.  They are charis-less Christians who atone for their sin by grinding out good works from a checklist.

– Sprinkle, Preston; Charis: God’s Scandalous Grace for Us; David C. Cook Publishing; Colorado Springs, CO; Kindle version; copyright 2014; page 28

We Should Read the Bible Theologically

Instead of reading the Bible morally, we should read it theologically.  This doesn’t mean that there aren’t some moral examples to follow.  Yes, by all means, flee like Joseph.  Nor does it mean hunting for verses that support our favorite theological doctrine.  Rather, reading the Bible theologically means that we look first and foremost at what the passage teaches us about God.  What is God doing?  How is God revealing Himself?  How is God going to overcome our sin, keep His promises, and reestablish the Eden-like relationship He created us for.

– Sprinkle, Preston; Charis: God’s Scandalous Grace for Us; David C. Cook Publishing; Colorado Springs, CO; Kindle version; copyright 2014; page 27-28

It Isn’t Playing Hide & Seek in the Old Testament…It’s On Every Page…

The Old Testament is all about grace.  You can’t understand grace apart from the Old Testament, and you can’t understand the Old Testament without understanding grace.  If you read the Old Testament and aren’t kindled and confronted by the scandal of grace, then you need to go back and read it again.  You missed it.  If you see only wrath and judgment, then you’ve missed the best part, the main plot, the primary message.  Grace is the spine that holds the whole thing together.  Look at any story, any chapter, and you’ll find a story of God’s relentless pursuit of His rebellious children.

– Sprinkle, Preston; Charis: God’s Scandalous Grace for Us; David C. Cook Publishing; Colorado Springs, CO; Kindle version; copyright 2014; page 26