In an Economy of Grace…

In an economy of grace, there is enough to go around.  The Father’s love and generosity are not scarce,  His table is brimming with luxurious fare.  That is why we invite those who cannot repay us.  After all, it is not our table, but his.  It is Christ who speaks to us today in the words of the prophet (Isaiah 55:1-2)

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 197

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The Means of Grace Often Becomes Yesterday’s News

Chasing the latest fad for spiritual growth, church growth and cultural impact, we eventually forget both how to reach the lost and how to keep the reached.  The ordinary means of grace becomes yesterday’s news.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 178

Stop Adding to the Gospel and Become Content

My thesis in this book is that we must turn from the frantic search for “something more” to “something more sustainable.”  We need to stop adding something more of ourselves to the gospel.  We need to be content with the gospel as God’s power for salvation.  We also need to be content with his ordinary means of grace that, over time, yield a harvest of plenty for everyone to enjoy.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page125

There Are Two Ways to Understand Revival…

There are two ways to understand revival.  The first is to see it as a “surprising work of God,” God’s “extraordinary blessing on his ordinary means of grace.”  That is how Jonathan Edwards say it, as Ian Murray summarizes.  God is utterly free to withhold or send revival as he pleases.

The second approach sees revival as something within our control – something that can be staged and managed with predictable results.  If you follow the right steps, you’ll get the right outcomes.  Basically, it’s a technological approach to religion. Like a genie in a bottle, even God is subject to the laws of cause and effect.

as quoted by Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; Kindle Edition; page 74-75

Sorry, There’s Not an App for That

Like every other area of life, we have come to believe that growth in Christ – as individuals or as churches – can and should be programmed to generate predictable outcomes that are unrealistic and are not even justified biblically.  We want big results – sooner rather than later.  And we’ve forgotten that God showers his extraordinary gifts through ordinary gifts through ordinary means of grace, loves us through ordinary fellow image bearers, and sends us out into the world to love and serve others in ordinary callings.

– Horton, Michael, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World; Zondervan; copyright 214; page 13

Three Reasons the New Testament Gives us Commands In Light of Living Under Grace…

Here are three reasons the New Testament still gives us commands [in light of the liberty given by grace]:

  1. The commandments enlighten our darkened hearts.
  2. Obedience to the commandments limits the damage of our sin.
  3. Disciplining ourselves to practice certain behaviors helps us develop a love for them.

– Greear, J.D.; Gospel: Recovering the Power that Made Christianity Revolutionary; B&H Publishing Group; Nashville, TN; Copyright 2011; Kindle Edition; page 193-194

It Will Never Look the Same

When you have tasted the grace of the gospel, no relationship, no matter how wrong or hurtful or annoying, looks the same to you.  You’ll see yourself as”first, sinner, and second, sinned against,” and when that happens, your entire disposition toward others’ offenses toward you will change.

– Greear, J.D.; Gospel: Recovering the Power that Made Christianity Revolutionary; B&H Publishing Group; Nashville, TN; Copyright 2011; Kindle Edition; page 120