The Gospel Is For Beleivers and Unbelievers Alike

The Bible’s message, however, is that the gospel is just as necessary for the Christian as for the unbeliever. We are to base the “duty” of discipleship on the gospel, resulting in the practice of a Christ-based acceptance with God and a Spirit-energized approach to the pursuit of holiness.  The so-called duty of discipleship then becomes a joy and a delight even though it requires vigorous effort.  So learn to “preach the gospel to yourself” every day, and in the joy and strength of knowing your sins are forgiven and sin’s dominion is broken, press on to become holy as He is holy.

– Bridges, Jerry; The Disciplined of Grace:God’s Role and Our Role in the Pursuit of Holiness; NavPress; Colorado Springs; copyright 1994; p. 231

Adversity is Meant for our Sanctification

So the discipline of adversity is given to us by God as a means of our sanctification.  Our role in this discipline is to respond to it and to acquiesce to whatever God may be doing, even though a particular instance of adversity makes no sense to us.  As we do this we will see in due time the fruit of the Spirit produced in our lives.

– Bridges, Jerry; The Disciplined of Grace:God’s Role and Our Role in the Pursuit of Holiness; NavPress; Colorado Springs; copyright 1994; p. 230

Our Ultimate Hope is not Maturity but Perfection

Our ultimate hope, though, is not in maturity of character in this life, as vauable as that is, but in the perfection of character in eternity.  The Apostle John wrote, “When he appears, we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is” (I John 3:2).  The often painful process of being transformed into His likeness will be over.  We shall be completely conformed to the likeness of the Lord Jesus Christ.

– Bridges, Jerry; The Disciplined of Grace:God’s Role and Our Role in the Pursuit of Holiness; NavPress; Colorado Springs; copyright 1994; p. 229

He Always Disciplines us For Our Good

God, however, always disciplines us for our good.  He knows what is best for each one of us.  He doesn’t have to debate with Himself over what is most suitable for us.  He knows intuitively and perfectly the nature, intensity, and duration of adversity that will best serve His purpose to make us partakers of His holiness.  He never brings more pain than is needed to accomplish His purpose (Lamentations 3:33).

– Bridges, Jerry; The Disciplined of Grace:God’s Role and Our Role in the Pursuit of Holiness; NavPress; Colorado Springs; copyright 1994; p.

Submitting to God and His Sovereign Right

To submit to the Father of our spirit denotes] an acquiescence in His sovereign right to do what He will with us as His own; a renunciation of self-will; an acknowledgement of His righteousness and wisdom in all His dealings with us; a sense of His care and love, with a due apprehension of the end of His chastisements; a diligent application of ourselves unto His mind and will, or to what He calls us to in an especial manner at that season; a keeping of our souls by persevering faith from weariness and despondency; a full resignation o ourselves to His will, as to the matter, manner, times and continuance of our afflictions.

– John Owen

as quoted by Bridges, Jerry; The Disciplined of Grace:God’s Role and Our Role in the Pursuit of Holiness; NavPress; Colorado Springs; copyright 1994; p.226

The Law of God is the Mirror of True Righteousness

The law of God is the mirror of true righteousness.  When we set our works before this mirror, the reflection in it tells us of our imperfections.  Jesus held this mirror up before the eyes of the rich young ruler, “You know the commandments: ‘Do not commit adultery, do not murder, do not steal…?'” (Luke 18:20).  It is important to note here that the commandments Jesus listed for the young ruler were those included in the so-called second table of the law, the commandments that deal with our responsibilities toward fellow human beings.  These are the commandments that concern adultery, murder, stealing, and so on.  Noticeably absent in Jesus’ summary were the first few commandments that deal explicitly with our direct obligations to God.

– R.C. Sproul, The Holiness of God, Tyndale House Publishers, Carol Stream, Ill., Copyright 1985, Kindle Edition

All Are Hardships Intended by God to be Means of Developing Christlike Character

Endure all hardship as discipline.  I don’t want to trivialize hardship, but all of us know that there are varying degrees of adversity.  Some is life shattering, such as the death of a loved one or a permanently disabling injury.  At the opposite end of the spectrum are situations that are really no more than temporary nuances, such as an unexpected visitor dropping by when you are working against a tight deadline.  All of these circumstances and events, whether trivial or serious, are intended by God to be means of developing more Christlike character.

– Bridges, Jerry; The Disciplined of Grace:God’s Role and Our Role in the Pursuit of Holiness; NavPress; Colorado Springs; copyright 1994; p. 224