Do Yourself a Favor…Read This Post in Its Entirety

I can totally relate to the prodigal son after he squandered his wealth (Luke 15: 11-32).  I resonate with the feelings he had when he was eating with the pigs, thinking he could back to the father as a slave.  SOmetimes I waited a few days or even weeks before talking to Him because I wanted to have a period of proving myself.  In doing this, I acted like a slave and obeyed as well as I could.  I figured I could still serve Him even though I felt uncomfortable having a real conversation with Him.

Have you ever felt this way?  Do you ever want to distance yourself from Him because you feel so much same over your sin?

This was a regular pattern for me.  I wanted to prove that I was sorry for what I did by being faithful for a period of time.  I wanted to develop a good track record before pursuing my relationship with Him again.  I wanted God to see that I could be a good servant.  Then I felt good enough to talk to God again.  But God didn’t want a good slave who tried really hard.  He wanted me to see that He was a good Father.  He wants intimacy.

– Chan, Francis; Forgotten God: Reversing the Tragic Neglect of the Holy Spirit; David C. Cook Publishers; Colorado Springs, CO; copyright 2009; p. 113

Advertisements

When We Experience This, We Will Begin to Wonder…

We have been chosen, grafted, adopted into the family of God.  And now that we are a part of the family, the Spirit causes us to call out “Abba! Father!”  Remember that Abba is the most intimate form for referring to a father.  It is like saying “Daddy”; it connotes a deep level of familiarity and intimacy.  As God’s Spirit speaks to our hearts, we can call out to God as our Abba.  We will begin to experience this intimate relationship more deeply than we ever thought possible, so much so that we will begin to wonder, Does everyone feel this loved by God?

– Chan, Francis; Forgotten God: Reversing the Tragic Neglect of the Holy Spirit; David C. Cook Publishers; Colorado Springs, CO; copyright 2009; p. 112