The Problem is Actually Not Being Christian Enough

Think of the people you consider fanatical.  They’re overbearing, self-righteous, opinionated, insensitive and harsh.  Why?  It’s not because they are too Christian but because they are not Christian enough.  They are fanatically zealous and courageous, but they are not fanatically humble, sensitive, loving, empathetic, forgiving, or understanding – as Christ was.  Because they think of Christianity as a self-improvement program they emulate the Jesus of the whips in the temple, but not the Jesus who said “Let him who is without sin cast the first stone” (John 8:7).  What strikes us as overly fanatical is actually a failure to be fully committed to Christ and his Gospel.

– Tim Keller, Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Reason, copyright 2008, page 57

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C.S. Lewis on Reading the Gospels

I have been reading poems, romances, vision literature, legends, and myths all my life.  I know what they are like.  I know none of them are like this.  Of this [gospel] text there are only two possible views.  Either this is reportage…or else, some unknown [ancient] writer…without known predecessors or successors, suddenly anticipated the whole technique of modern novelistic realistic narrative.

– C.S. Lewis on reading the gospels

as quoted by Tim Keller, Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Reason, copyright 2008, page 106

A Promise that the World We All Want is Coming

The most instructive thing about this text is, however, what it says about the purpose of Biblical miracles.  They lead not only to cognitive belief, but to worship, to awe and wonder.  Jesus’ miracles in particular were never magic tricks, designed only to impress and coerce.  You never see him say something like: “See that tree over there?  Watch me make it burst into flames!”  Instead he used miraculous power to heal the sick, feed the hunger, and raise the dead.  Why?  We modern people think of miracles as the suspension of the natural order, but Jesus meant them to be the restoration of the natural order.  The Bible tells us that God did not originally make the wold to have disease, hunger and death in it.  Jesus has come to redeem where it went wrong and heal the world where it is broken.  His miracles are not just proofs that he has power but also wonderful foretastes of what he is going to do with that power.  Jesus’ miracles are not just a challenge to our minds but a promise to our hearts, that the world we all want is coming.

– Tim Keller, Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism, copyright 2008, page 95-96

The God-Man Suffers With Patience

[Christ] the god-man suffers too, with patience.  Evil and death can no longer be entirely imputed to him since he suffers and dies.  The night on Golgotha is so important in the history of man only because, in its shadows, the divinity ostensibly abandoned its traditional privilege, and lived through to the end, despair included, the agony of death.  Thus is explained the “Lama sabachtani” and the frightful doubt of Christ in agony

– Albert Camus

as quoted by, Tim Keller, Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism, copyright 2008, page 31